satanshoe:


Kate Moss at Tupac’s funeral.

this a funeral pic or vogue shoot

satanshoe:

Kate Moss at Tupac’s funeral.

this a funeral pic or vogue shoot

(via fuckyeahsexanddrugs)


newsweek:

The Iraqi soldier died attempting to pull himself up over the dashboard of his truck. The flames engulfed his vehicle and incinerated his body, turning him to dusty ash and blackened bone.
In a photograph taken soon afterward, the soldier’s hand reaches out of the shattered windshield, which frames his face and chest. The colors and textures of his hand and shoulders look like those of the scorched and rusted metal around him.
Fire has destroyed most of his features, leaving behind a skeletal face, fixed in a final rictus. He stares without eyes.
On February 28, 1991, Kenneth Jarecke stood in front of the charred man, parked amid the carbonized bodies of his fellow soldiers, and photographed him. At one point, before he died this dramatic mid-retreat death, the soldier had had a name.
He’d fought in Saddam Hussein’s army and had a rank and an assignment and a unit. He might have been devoted to the dictator who sent him to occupy Kuwait and fight the Americans. Or he might have been an unlucky young man with no prospects, recruited off the streets of Baghdad. Jarecke took the picture just before a ceasefire officially ended Operation Desert Storm—the U.S.-led military action that drove Saddam Hussein and his troops out of Kuwait, which they had annexed and occupied the previous August.
The image and its anonymous subject might have come to symbolize the Gulf War. Instead, it went unpublished in the United States, not because of military obstruction but because of editorial choices.
It’s hard to calculate the consequences of a photograph’s absence. But sanitized images of warfare, The Atlantic’s Conor Friedersdorf argues, make it “easier … to accept bloodless language” such as 1991 references to “surgical strikes” or modern-day terminology like “kinetic warfare.”
The Vietnam War was notable for its catalog of chilling and iconic war photography; Some images, like Ron Haeberle’s pictures of the My Lai massacre, were initially kept from the public. But other violent images—Nick Ut’s scene of child napalm victims and Eddie Adams’s photo of a Vietcong man’s execution—won Pulitzer Prizes and had a tremendous impact on the outcome of the war.
The War Photo No One Would Publish - The Atlantic

newsweek:

The Iraqi soldier died attempting to pull himself up over the dashboard of his truck. The flames engulfed his vehicle and incinerated his body, turning him to dusty ash and blackened bone.

In a photograph taken soon afterward, the soldier’s hand reaches out of the shattered windshield, which frames his face and chest. The colors and textures of his hand and shoulders look like those of the scorched and rusted metal around him.

Fire has destroyed most of his features, leaving behind a skeletal face, fixed in a final rictus. He stares without eyes.

On February 28, 1991, Kenneth Jarecke stood in front of the charred man, parked amid the carbonized bodies of his fellow soldiers, and photographed him. At one point, before he died this dramatic mid-retreat death, the soldier had had a name.

He’d fought in Saddam Hussein’s army and had a rank and an assignment and a unit. He might have been devoted to the dictator who sent him to occupy Kuwait and fight the Americans. Or he might have been an unlucky young man with no prospects, recruited off the streets of Baghdad. Jarecke took the picture just before a ceasefire officially ended Operation Desert Storm—the U.S.-led military action that drove Saddam Hussein and his troops out of Kuwait, which they had annexed and occupied the previous August.

The image and its anonymous subject might have come to symbolize the Gulf War. Instead, it went unpublished in the United States, not because of military obstruction but because of editorial choices.

It’s hard to calculate the consequences of a photograph’s absence. But sanitized images of warfare, The Atlantic’s Conor Friedersdorf argues, make it “easier … to accept bloodless language” such as 1991 references to “surgical strikes” or modern-day terminology like “kinetic warfare.”

The Vietnam War was notable for its catalog of chilling and iconic war photography; Some images, like Ron Haeberle’s pictures of the My Lai massacre, were initially kept from the public. But other violent images—Nick Ut’s scene of child napalm victims and Eddie Adams’s photo of a Vietcong man’s execution—won Pulitzer Prizes and had a tremendous impact on the outcome of the war.

The War Photo No One Would Publish - The Atlantic

(via anindiscriminatecollection)


asylum-art:

19-Year-Old Artist Savannah Burgess Spent Her Summer Drawing This Epic Chinese Zodiac Poster

on Facebook,(savannahrcb) on deviantART,  Etsy

While we were spending our summer drenched in pools of our own sweat, 19-year-old Atlanta-based Artist Savannah Burgess was hard at work creating a masterpiece. She spent a good chunk of her summer creating an epic drawing of the 12 animals of the Chinese Zodiac.

The best part is, Burgess uploaded images following her progress as she worked on this 30” x 44” (76cm x 1.1m) drawing. Each picture highlights a different animal in the composition, which comes together into one epic art pieces.

Burgess is selling both digital prints and limited-edition full-sized prints of her drawing, so if you want to support this young artist, check out her Etsy!


dvdp:

140822 ∞

dvdp:

140822 

(via natillygirl)




shanellbklyn:

dynastylnoire:

stair-diving-with-hayes:

Ladies and Gentleman, the man that will be in history books. He was throwing the burning tear gas. Not to the cops but away from the children protesting. In his American Shirt and bag of chips. Check his twitter.

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

HE HAS ALSO STATED NOT TO PURCHASE THE T-SHIRTS THAT ARE BEING SOLD WITH HIS IMAGE BECAUSE HIM NOR THE TOWN OF FERGUSON WILL SEE THAT MONEY! 

Just needs to be stated again! 

Not to the cops but away from the children protesting”

(via classycaryn)


asylum-art:

Dividus: Anatomical Collages

Artist on tumblr, on Behance, Society6

(via asylum-art)


jumblepusher:

Richard Avedon. “Untitled (Dovima in Balenciaga)”. 1950. (Dovima, Harper’s Bazaar).

jumblepusher:

Richard Avedon. “Untitled (Dovima in Balenciaga)”. 1950. (Dovima, Harper’s Bazaar).


memeguy-com:

Some signs exist because theyre practical Others have a hell of a story behind them

memeguy-com:

Some signs exist because theyre practical Others have a hell of a story behind them

(via nvbianprincess)



asylum-art:

 Hilla Shamia: Wood And Metal Unite In Striking Furniture

Hilla Shamia, an ingenious Israeli artist and designer, creates beautiful one-of-a-kind wood and aluminum desks and stools using a unique method that marries cold aluminum and beautiful pieces of wood.

To create these unprecedented pieces, Shamia poured molten aluminum onto logs of raw cypress and eucalyptus that have been cut lengthwise. The burning of the molten aluminum on the surface of the raw wooden log creates a beautiful black layer of carbon that creates a boundary between the cold silvery color of the aluminum and the wood’s beautiful natural colors and forms. Because the aluminum is molten, it runs into every crack and crevice of the wood, creating a strong bond and a striking appearance.



eurotrottest:

odditymall:

The Defender is a pepper spray that when sprayed takes a picture of the person you’re spraying and sends it the police along with your GPS location, user information, as well as flashing a bright light in the attackers face and emitting a loud alarm.

—->http://odditymall.com/pepper-spray-that-takes-a-picture-and-alerts-the-police

BRUH

(via butitsbetterifyoudo)